EU-Scrolling Explained Part 2

Continuing on from the first part of our discussion, we are going to discover more in detail the differences between EU and Non-EU scrolling.

So why don’t Non-Eus have rounds continuing for months and months having a chance to be booked into every university they choose? The answer is because non-EU candidates are not as likely to give up their seats. Roughly 95% of Non-EU candidates accept their first choice university offer in the first round. With nobody renouncing their seats there’s no opportunity for the scrolling to take place. Which is why the 1st choice university for a Non-EU student is incredibly important. It’s not because their subsequent choices are less valid or not considered, but because not enough students renounce their seats to have multiple rounds and scrolling.

A more detailed breakdown of Non-EU scrolling can be found here.

A huge part of why so many EUs give up their seats has a massive impact from the number of Italians who sit the exam. This sounds quite strange at first but actually makes a lot of sense. The largest portion of seats given up in the EU ranking are by Italian nationals. The exam to study Medicine through ITALIAN is held one week before the exam to study through English, so consequently the rankings for the Italian exam are also released a week early. Most Italian students will sit the exam in both languages to double their chances of studying Medicine, which is a pretty good idea, however a lot would also prefer to do the course through their mother-tongue language. As the weeks go by and Italian students hold out for the possibility of a seat in the Italian course, they keep the English course as a back up. As more Italian candidates are offered seats from the Italian ranking they renounce their seats from the English ranking no longer needing to keep it as a back up. All in all this leads to a massive withdrawal of candidates from the English ranking freeing up a tonne of seats allowing the scrolling to occur the way it does.

This is one of the largest contributing factors to the EU scrolling system, giving the false impression that Non-EU candidates do not have this opportunity. Both EU and Non-EU candidates have the opportunity to receive an offer if a higher candidate refuses their seat; however it’s much more likely that an EU candidate will refuse their seat.

Other reasons seats are renounced are sometimes accidental as sad as this sounds. Every week a new round is announced with new offers being made, however to continue being considered in the ranking, you MUST confirm your interest in the ranking every week. While luckily there is a pretty simple way to express your interest in a possible seat weekly, its unfortunate that a lot of people are unaware of this. To confirm your interest in the ranking you must ensure to click the button shown below when you log in to Universitaly.it.

IMAT Scrolling EU student - confirmation page on rank registration system of university application     IMAT Scrolling EU student - confirmation page on rank registration system of university application

If you do not complete this action your status within the ranking changes to “NOT CONFIRM INTEREST”, removing you from the possibility from any subsequent offers. The new and freed up seats offered will literally skip you and instead be given to candidates ranking below you.

IMAT Scrolling EU student - student rankings with detailsIMAT Scrolling EU student - student rankings with details

The final reason why EU seats are given up that we will discuss is because students do not enrol in time. Unfortunately, the timeframe to accept your seat and enroll, find a place to live etc. etc. is quite short. You usually have less than a week of being ASSIGNED to a university to accept your offer and complete your registration, which is not a problem that Non-Eu students have to deal with to the same degree. However most universities are very understanding, so if you are able to contact the university and pay your fees they will hold your seat for you until you can show up in person.