About the IMAT

All of the information you need to know about the IMAT as well as some helpful tips to ensure you have the best information possible.


So you didn’t do as well as you hoped. Now what?

There are wins and losses of life, but it’s not the end of everything. It’s just an opportunity for us try again and better. Elisa talks about her experience with sitting the IMAT.


Registering as an E.U. Student

Registering for the IMAT as an EU student is thankfully slightly easier compared to our fellow Non-EU students. You are considered to be an EU student under a few different circumstances despite your citizenship status.


Registering as a non-E.U. Student

When the “Pre-enrollment” date of the IMAT is released by MIUR (around April) the first step is to go to your local consulate/embassy. The enrolment process for Non-EU candidates is slightly more cumbersome, however the reasoning behind it is very helpful.


IMAT Scrolling for EU students

The idea of “scrolling” is quite foreign to most students. The IMAT uses a different ranking & scrolling system to offer test takers seats in their chosen universities. While the concept is hard to grasp at first, its very logical.


IMAT Scrolling for EU Students Part 2

In the second part of our instalment on the explanation of the ranking and scrolling, we discover the reasons behind why the scrolling is set up the way it is. As well as explaining why Non-EU students to not get as many rounds in the scrolling as their fellow EU students.


IMAT Scrolling for NON-EU Students

The idea of “scrolling” is quite foreign to most students. The IMAT uses a different ranking & scrolling system to offer test takers seats in their chosen universities. While the concept is hard to grasp at first, its very logical.


What are “Free Spots” for Non-EU students

Non-EU students are sometimes offered a seat in a university that isn’t there first choice. While this is strange to hear due to how the scrolling system works for them, it is a possibility.